Keynote Speakers

Terje AVEN

Affiliation:
Professor of Risk analysis and Risk management at University of Stavanger (Norway); Principal researcher at International Research Institute of Stavanger (IRIS)

Topic:
1. Foundations of safety science: theories, principles, methods and tools      

Title:
Foundations of risk assessment and management, with applications to occupational safety

Short introduction:
In this talk Professor Terje Aven will present and discuss some recent advances on the foundation of risk assessment and management related to the conceptualisation, analysis and characterisation of risk. Occupational safety applications will be highlighted. Key topics include: What is risk?  How to best describe risk? How to treat uncertainties? How to reflect knowledge in risk assessments? How to take into account potential surprises (black swans)? The discussion will also address some management and decision-making issues related to the use of risk assessment. 

Olivier SALVI

Affiliation:
President of INERIS DÉVELOPPEMENT SAS (France); General manager of EU-VRi; Secretary General of ETPIS

Topic:
2. Research to practice: achievements, lessons learned and challenges    

Title:
From safety research to implementation of the results

Short introduction:
In the context of an intense production of knowledge and development of new technologies, the main challenge for risk researchers is the timely and efficient use of their research results to support risk-based decision making. The keynote discusses the role of scientific experts as support to authorities and industry and describes several initiatives contributing to bring together the stakeholders involved in risk management and to transfer to the practitioners the knowledge and technologies gained through research. The paper describes in particular initiatives aiming at transferring research results to standardization (example of the EC Funded nanoSTAIR project, www.nanostair.eu-vri.eu); the creation of platforms to enhance interactions between research, industry, policymakers, NGOs, trade unions and regulators (example of the European Technology Platform on Industrial Safety, www.industrialsafety-tp.org), or the ERA-NET instrument for research programming enabling to organise joint call for projects funded by several governments or research funding agencies (example of the ERA-NET on industrial safety – SAF€RA, www.safera.industrialsafety-tp.org and the history of the joint calls are at: www.safera.eu).

Linda BELLAMY

Affiliation:
Managing Director and Consultant at White Queen BV (the Netherlands)

Topic:
2. Research to practice: achievements, lessons learned and challenges    

Title:
Resilience in occupational accident prevention: Handling uncertainty in the workplace.

Short introduction:
How has the term resilience been used historically in different contexts and what does it mean in the workplace with respect to occupational safety? It is proposed that resilience is appropriate for dealing with situations where there is high uncertainty and where the normative approach for foreseen risks is not applicable, including the way in which accidents are analysed for lessons learned.  Resilient characteristics of organisations and individuals have been identified, which are considered to increase the chance of a successful response when faced with the unexpected.  It is suggested that the approach to accident prevention should include examination of successful responding in cases of recovering from the unexpected, including those cases where a good result is attributed to “luck”.

David TJONG

Affiliation:
Global Director of HS&E at Ideal Standard International (Belgium) – responsible for the European, Middle East & Africa, Asia Pacific and South America region

Topic:
3. Risk management and safety culture: case studies, best practices and further needs

Title:
Leadership Culture & Risk Management

Short introduction:

  • Leadership is the key for everything we do. For Health and Safety, it is no exception
  • Share quote from a renowned Leadership Expert
  • Start with Why, with the Strategy, Culture and Process of Continuous Improvement
  • Apply Root Cause / Safeguard Analysis, refine risk assessment by implementing additional controls and not relying on Human Performances

Lars HOFFMANN

Affiliation:
Vice President for Occupational Health and Safety and Technical Risks at Siemens (Germany)

Topic:
3. Risk management and safety culture: case studies, best practices and further needs

Title:
Implementing a culture of prevention

Short introduction:
Safe behavior is not only determined by rules, regulations and procedures alone but also through personal values, attitudes and the commitment of management and employees. Zero Harm Culture @ Siemens is a global program to raise awareness on occupational health and safety and to sustainably improve health and safe behavior. It starts with the leadership and commitment of managers and can only become a living corporate culture if everyone contributes.

Hans-Horst KONKOLEWSKY

Affiliation:
Secretary General of the International Social Security Association, ISSA (Denmark)

Topic:
4. Safety regulation: reasonable practicable approach

Title:
“Vision Zero” – a non-governmental approach to safety

Short introduction:
There is a growing international consensus that efforts to develop a global prevention culture should be reinforced and that both governmental and non-governmental regulation are critical in order to reduce the unacceptably high number of work accidents and occupational diseases worldwide. The ISSA has on this background developed a new prevention campaign, called “Vision Zero”, which aims to mobilise business leaders to integrate safety, health and well-being at work in their core management function as well as company culture. The campaign will be launched at the XXI World Congress for Safety and Health at Work in September 2017 in Singapore.

Janis JANSZ

Affiliation:
Senior lecturer at Curtin University (Australia); Director of World Safety Organisation National Office for Australia; Director of the ILO Collaboration Research Centre

Topic:
5. Education and Training: prerequisite for safety

Title:
Education and Training. Pre-requisite for safety.

Short introduction:
This presentation examines why there is a need to provide occupational safety and health education and training. The history of workplace health and safety education and training is traced through British legislation, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and through Australian law. Case studies and examples of what is currently included in work related safety and health education for children, people in the workplace, for the public, and the benefits of this education, are included.

Pavel DANIHELKA

Affiliation:
Professor of Risk management and Chemical safety at VSB-TUO (Czech Republic); President of Czech Technology Platform on Industrial Safety (CZ-TPIS)

Topic:
6. Complexity and safety: multidisciplinarity and inter-stakeholder view

Title:
Looking at safety: can we see one picture?

Short introduction:
Safety has become to be a “buzzword” of modern society, including many aspects of OHS. Even if important research work has been performed and several stakeholders act in various position in safety management, the problem persists in insufficient mutual understanding between scientific disciplines and among stakeholders. The reason is partly in narrow scientific visions and separated stakeholders’ interests, but more complex aspects are observed, too. At least three vast scientific domains should be involved in parallel (natural, social and technical sciences). To overcome this gap, we need to create the system of multidisciplinary communication and complexity understanding, including the education of new kind of experts – “generalists” in safety. Complexity of safety, involving many feedbacks, may lead to paradigm change, e.g. to involvement of chaos theory, as well.